Posts Tagged ‘medical terms’

What Does "LVH" Mean?

Saturday, July 19th, 2008

Here is a cardiac, or heart, term.

The heart is a muscle designed to pump blood, as you know.  Actually, it is two pumps in one. Each pump has an atrium, or pre-load pump, and a ventricle, the main pump.  One pump is on the right (R) side, the other on the left (L).  They share a central wall.  The right side pumps blood to the lungs, the left to the body and all its organs. 

Like any muscle, it will enlarge if it is exercised.  Now, voluntary muscles get exercised by lifting weights or running or doing an activity over and over.  The heart muscle enlarges by pumping harder.  It pumps harder when it has to pump against an elevated blood pressure.

So, in one has hypertension (elevated blood pressure), the heart muscle has to work harder and gets larger than it should/needs to be.  We call that

Left Ventricular Hypertrophy or LVH

It can be determined by doing an EKG, part of the usual evaluation of how your heart is working.

So, get your blood pressure checked on a regular basis, and an EKG on occasion.

For Your health,

Blessings,

Dr Jon
MAR – Metabolic Assessment Regimen

What Does "RA" Mean?

Sunday, July 13th, 2008

Here is an interesting acronym, not because it is so interesting in itself, but because it points out the fallacy and fun(?) and ambiguity of acronyms.

If you are a rheumatologist, a doctor who deals with inflammation of joints and skin, “RA” stands for

Rheumatoid Arthritis.

This is where the body’s immune system attacks the lining in joints that makes the lubricating fluid that keeps our joints moving easily. Inflammation of these joints causes pain, swelling, heat and eventually big knobby joints and lack of movement, even to the point of locking up and fusing together.

However, if you are a Pulmonologist, a doctor who deals with lungs and breathing, “RA” would stand for

Room Air.

When doing tests for how much oxygen you have in your blood, the lung doctor wants to know how much you have with regular conditions of breathing, or without any added oxygen. This is called “room air.”

So, acronyms can be a shorthand for medical personnel, but can also be confusing! As in,

“Gee Doc, my joints are stiff, how is my room air doing?”

Till next time,

For Your Health,

Blessings,

Dr Jon

MAR – Metabolic Assesssment Regimen

What Does "SOB" Mean?

Monday, May 12th, 2008

This is a simple one, although it can easily be confused with a not-so-nice expression!

SOB = Short Of Breath

Used in conjunction with breathing symptoms.

For your Health,

Dr Jon
MAR = Metabolic Assessment Regimen

What Does "GERD" Mean?

Monday, May 12th, 2008

So here is an interesting question….

“GERD” stands for GastroEsophageal Reflux Disease or what we used to call Acid Reflux.
Excuse my cynicism but we have put the bigger words on it to make it sound more disastrous, more valuable to treat (so we get more money) and make it more mysterious.

What it really means is the person who has it is in trouble.

Why would I sat that?

Because, usually, it means you are not making enough acid in the stomach which means you are not stimulating proper signals to get enough base in your duodenum which all really means that you are not digesting your food properly. Therefore you are not getting enough energy/nutrients in your body so you are not making enough acid in your stomach, so you are not……

You get the idea. Downward spiral. More Dis-ease. Not enough energy. Affects other things besides the stomach. Affects the big energy requirers in our bodies: brain and heart. Is there a simple reason why we have so much depression and heart dis-ease in our country? Could it be that we are simply not digesting our food, not getting enough nutrients? Could this explain the epidemic of obesity – a search for nutrients??

Makes one think and wonder…….

For Your Health,

Dr Jon
MAR – Metabolic Assessment Regimen

PS. A simple answer to GERD? Apple Cider Vinegar, couple of teaspoons in half a glass of water before meals. Amazing.

What does "HTN" mean?

Sunday, May 4th, 2008

“HTN” is the acronym, the abbreviation for

HyperTensioN

which is the fancier word for

“High Blood Pressure”.

Which could also be abbreviated “HBP“.

This is defined to be pressure above 140/90 (systolic/diastolic). This varies somewhat depending on what other medical conditions you may have or may have had. People with heart disease should be below 130/85 and with diabetes should be below 130/80. (It will probably change again soon!)

As you know, ‘HTN’ is the “silent killer” in that you may have no symptoms of elevated pressure, yet just the elevation itself is doing significant damage to eyes, heart, brain, and kidneys. Interestingly, damage to the kidneys by elevated blood pressure will itself cause elevation of blood pressure, so you end up on this downward, worsening spiral.

Bottom line: GO GET YOUR BLOOD PRESSURE CHECKED!

and get it checked regularly.

For Your Health,

Dr Jon
MAR – Metabolic Assessment Regimen

What does "x-ray" mean?

Wednesday, April 30th, 2008

Is this something out of a science fiction novel?

Actually it is.

We all know what x-rays are, right? Those things you get when you break your arm or leg and go to the Emergency Room. But do you know where the name came from and why?

This is the sci-fi part.

When scientists first discovered that certain radio tubes were emitting high energy packets that could go through walls and tissue and whatever, they knew they existed but they had no idea what they really were. Hence the name “x” and “ray”. “X” is the algebraic/scientific term for the “unknown” thing. The energy was a beam behaving similarly to light so it was called a “ray”. Putting the two terms together they came up with the “Unknown light-like beam” or, more simply, “x-ray”.

The x-ray passes through muscle tissue and blood and water without slowing much or losing much energy. It will hit the chemical-coated film behind whatever is being “beamed”. This reacts with the chemical and turns the film black. The x-ray will not go through dense material like bone so it leaves the chemical unreacted and this shows up as white when the film is processed.

So the simple x-ray film is a 2-dimensional black and white “photograph” (actually “rayograph”). Adding the technology of the CAT scan stacks up the 2 dimensions making it a nearly 3-dimensional rendition.

For your health,

Dr Jon

MAR – Metabolic Assessment Regimen

What does "CAT Scan" mean?

Sunday, April 27th, 2008

Like an MRI, a CAT scan is also a diagnostic tool to try to find out what is going on inside your body.

CAT stands for Computerized Axial Tomography.

This is an x-ray which is taken in multiple layers. Then the “film” is run through a computer program that adds all the films from all the layers and lets you see the whole picture at once. In one sense it is almost like the difference between a snapshot and a movie. The snapshot (simple x-ray) takes a one shot look. The movie (CAT scan) takes a complete, in-depth, full thickness look and thus gives much more information and more usable information.

Like the regular x-ray, this is best for looking at dense material like bone.

For your Health,

Dr Jon

MAR – Metabolic Assessment Regimen

What does 'MRI' mean?

Sunday, April 27th, 2008

Great question!

Often heard is, “Did you get the MRI of your shoulder (or leg, or……..)?”

Obviously this is a test doctors order to discover more about what is going on inside your body. Suppose you turn your ankle and there may be a ligament strain or perhaps a break in a bone. The doctor will write an order for you to go get an MRI.

The letters stand for Magnetic Resonance Image.

Your body is place in a magnetic field which affects the molecular alignment of molecules in the body part being looked at. The energy released in this whole process is used to print a picture on film, similar to x-rays. However, the detail is much better than x-rays since it allows you to actually “look at” soft tissue like muscles and ligaments and cartilage, the components of joints, for example.

Simply put, an MRI is a super-duper “x-ray” which is MUCH better at looking at non bone parts of our bodies to see if there is any structural damage.

For Your Health,

Dr Jon
The Renegade Doctor, the Medical Heretic

MAR – Metabolic Assessment Regimen
Discover how Healthy you REALLY are!